Commands tagged sed (369)

  • Checks the Gmail ATOM feed for your account, parses it and outputs a list of unread messages. For some reason sed gets stuck on OS X, so here's a Perl version for the Mac: curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*<name>(.*)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/' If you want to see the name of the last person, who added a message to the conversation, change the greediness of the operators like this: curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | perl -pe 's/^<title>(.*)<\/title>.*?<name>(.*?)<\/name>.*$/$2 - $1/' Show Sample Output


    46
    curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '<entry>' '{for (i=2; i<=NF; i++) {print $i}}' | sed -n "s/<title>\(.*\)<\/title.*name>\(.*\)<\/name>.*/\2 - \1/p"
    postrational · 2009-09-07 21:56:40 12
  • In this case it's better do to use the dedicated tool


    44
    ssh-keygen -R <the_offending_host>
    bunam · 2010-07-11 19:37:24 0

  • 30
    sed -i 8d ~/.ssh/known_hosts
    prayer · 2010-07-10 14:22:34 1
  • recursively traverse the directory structure from . down, look for string "oldstring" in all files, and replace it with "newstring", wherever found also: grep -rl oldstring . |xargs perl -pi~ -e 's/oldstring/newstring'


    25
    $ grep -rl oldstring . |xargs sed -i -e 's/oldstring/newstring/'
    netfortius · 2009-03-03 20:10:19 9
  • Yeah I know it's been up here a million times, but this service is a really clean and nice one. Nothing but your IP address on it. Actually I was to write something like this, and noticed this on appspot... ;) Show Sample Output


    23
    curl ip.appspot.com
    ktoso · 2009-10-31 21:11:10 2
  • If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date [email protected]$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C '[email protected]' # /home/gpl/.ssh/[email protected] # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz . I personally find myself having to reference date --help quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner. Here's the old version: alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t' This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ] Show Sample Output


    21
    alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
    AskApache · 2010-04-21 01:22:18 5
  • Delete a range of line


    18
    sed -i <file> -re '<start>,<end>d'
    Zulu · 2012-02-02 17:59:18 1
  • This command find all files in the current dir and subdirs, and replace all occurances of "oldstring" in every file with "newstring".


    16
    find . -type f -exec sed -i s/oldstring/newstring/g {} +
    SlimG · 2009-12-09 00:46:13 6
  • Use the following variation for FreeBSD: openssl rand 6 | xxd -p | sed 's/\(..\)/\1:/g; s/:$//'


    16
    openssl rand -hex 6 | sed 's/\(..\)/\1:/g; s/.$//'
    putnamhill · 2010-09-23 02:31:12 0

  • 15
    check(){ curl -sI $1 | sed -n 's/Location: *//p';}
    putnamhill · 2010-09-30 12:29:02 1
  • echo "http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com" | sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e http://www.google.com Works under bash on linux. just alter the '-e' option to its corresponding equivalence in your system to execute escape characters correctly.


    13
    sed -e's/%\([0-9A-F][0-9A-F]\)/\\\\\x\1/g' | xargs echo -e
    mohan43u · 2009-05-25 05:37:44 3
  • This one uses dictionary.com


    13
    pronounce(){ wget -qO- $(wget -qO- "http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/[email protected]" | grep 'soundUrl' | head -n 1 | sed 's|.*soundUrl=\([^&]*\)&.*|\1|' | sed 's/%3A/:/g;s/%2F/\//g') | mpg123 -; }
    matthewbauer · 2010-03-13 04:23:56 4
  • Though without infinite time and knowledge of how the site will be designed in the future this may stop working, it still will serve as a simple straight forward starting point. This uses the observation that the only item marked as strong on the page is the single logical line that includes the italicized fact. If future revisions of the page show failure, or intermittent failure, one may simply alter the above to read. wget randomfunfacts.com -O - 2>/dev/null | tee lastfact | grep \<strong\> | sed "s;^.*<i>\(.*\)</i>.*$;\1;" The file lastfact, can then be examined whenever the command fails.


    13
    wget randomfunfacts.com -O - 2>/dev/null | grep \<strong\> | sed "s;^.*<i>\(.*\)</i>.*$;\1;"
    tali713 · 2010-03-30 23:49:30 1
  • Prints the 4th line and then quits. (Credit goes to flatcap in comments: http://www.brpent.com/commands/view/6031/print-just-line-4-from-a-textfile#comment.)


    12
    sed -n '4{p;q}'
    kniht · 2010-07-10 00:26:22 2
  • The -i option in sed allows in-place editing of the input file. Replace myexpression with any regular expression. /expr/d syntax means if the expression matches then delete the line. You can reverse the functionality to keep matching lines only by using: sed -i -n '/myexpression/p' /path/to/file.txt


    11
    sed -i '/myexpression/d' /path/to/file.txt
    jgc · 2009-11-09 11:40:45 2
  • seq -s ' ' 1 9 | sed -n ':a;p;s/ *\w$//;h;/^$/t;b a;q' | tac | awk '{for(i=1;i 1x1=1 1x2=2 2x2=4 1x3=3 2x3=6 3x3=9 1x4=4 2x4=8 3x4=12 4x4=16 1x5=5 2x5=10 3x5=15 4x5=20 5x5=25 1x6=6 2x6=12 3x6=18 4x6=24 5x6=30 6x6=36 1x7=7 2x7=14 3x7=21 4x7=28 5x7=35 6x7=42 7x7=49 1x8=8 2x8=16 3x8=24 4x8=32 5x8=40 6x8=48 7x8=56 8x8=64 1x9=9 2x9=18 3x9=27 4x9=36 5x9=45 6x9=54 7x9=63 8x9=72 9x9=81


    11
    seq 9 | sed 'H;g' | awk -v RS='' '{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)printf("%dx%d=%d%s", i, NR, i*NR, i==NR?"\n":"\t")}'
    kev · 2011-10-22 18:41:09 4
  • I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server. So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg. Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time. Show Sample Output


    10
    sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
    AskApache · 2009-10-02 05:03:10 0
  • Not my script. Belongs to mathewbauer. Used without his permission. This script gives a single line as shown in the sample output. NOTE: I have blanked out the IP address for obvious security reasons. But you will get whatever is your IP if you run the script. Tested working in bash. Show Sample Output


    10
    curl -s "http://www.geody.com/geoip.php?ip=$(curl -s icanhazip.com)" | sed '/^IP:/!d;s/<[^>][^>]*>//g'
    getkaizer · 2009-11-04 07:15:02 3

  • 9
    echo Print text vertically|sed 's/\(.\)/\1\n/g'
    axelabs · 2009-03-04 23:58:02 6

  • 9
    sed '/^#.*DEBUG.*/ s/^#//' $FILE
    svg · 2009-07-30 09:30:17 3

  • 9
    curl -s 'http://checkip.dyndns.org' | sed 's/.*Current IP Address: \([0-9\.]*\).*/\1/g'
    kulor · 2009-08-06 11:54:31 1

  • 9
    color()(set -o pipefail;"[email protected]" 2>&1>&3|sed $'s,.*,\e[31m&\e[m,'>&2)3>&1
    bkmeneguello · 2013-01-30 13:42:03 0

  • 8
    sed -i 's/^.*DEBUG.*/#&/' $file
    svg · 2009-07-30 09:20:37 4
  • Having to escape forwardslashes when using sed can be a pain. However, it's possible to instead of using / as the separator to use : . I found this by trying to substitute $PWD into my pattern, like so sed "s/~.*/$PWD/" file.txt Of course, $PWD will expand to a character string that begins with a / , which will make sed spit out an error such as "sed: -e expression #1, char 8: unknown option to `s'". So simply changing it to sed "s:~.*:$PWD:" file.txt did the trick. Show Sample Output


    8
    sed "s:/old/direcory/:/new/directory/:" <file>
    thebillywayne · 2009-08-06 00:37:45 1
  • I often need to extract a function from a bash script and this command will do it. Show Sample Output


    8
    sed -n '/^function h\(\)/,/^}/p' script.sh
    haivu · 2009-10-19 07:55:35 0
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Remove a line from a file using sed (useful for updating known SSH server keys when they change)
For example, to remove line 5 from foo, type: vi +5d +wq foo

Shell function to create a menu of items which may be inserted into the X paste buffer.
The function will take a comma separated list of items to be 'selected' by xsel -i: $ smenu "First item to paste,Paste me #2,Third menu item" You will then be prompted to choose one of the menu items. After you choose, you will be able to paste the string by clicking the middle mouse button. The menu will keep prompting you to choose menu items until you break out with Control-C.

list files recursively by size

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Copy a folder tree through ssh using compression (no temporary files)
This command will copy a folder tree (keeping the parent folders) through ssh. It will: - compress the data - stream the compressed data through ssh - decompress the data on the local folder This command will take no additional space on the host machine (no need to create compressed tar files, transfer it and then delete it on the host). There is some situations (like mirroring a remote machine) where you simply cant wait for a huge time taking scp command or cant compress the data to a tarball on the host because of file system space limitation, so this command can do the job quite well. This command performs very well mainly when a lot of data is involved in the process. If you copying a low amount of data, use scp instead (easier to type)

find file/dir by excluding some unwanted dirs and filesystems
Consider using this cmd when: 1. You are planning to traverse a big directory. 2. There is a subdir you don't want find to decend to. (entirely ignore) 3. You don't want find to decend to any mounted filesystems under this dir. * The -xdev flag tells find do not go to other filesystems. * -path ./junk_dir -prune is the pattern to ignore ./junk_dir entirely. * The rest is the typical search and print. To ignore multiple subdirs, you can just iterate the pattern, e.g. find . -path ./junk1 -prune -o -path ./junk2 -prune ... If you do want to include other filesystems, then remove -xdev flag. If you want to search files, then change -type d to -type f.

Make backups recurse through directories

Encrypted archive with openssl and tar
The lifehacker way: http://lifehacker.com/software/top/geek-to-live--encrypt-your-data-178005.php#Alternate%20Method:%20OpenSSL "That command will encrypt the unencrypted-data.tar file with the password you choose and output the result to encrypted-data.tar.des3. To unlock the encrypted file, use the following command:" $ openssl des3 -d -salt -in encrypted-data.tar.des3 -out unencrypted-data.tar

Compare an archive with filesystem
and you quickly know the files you changed

Search and play youtube videos directly to terminal (no X needed)
pyt 'Stairway to heaven - Led Zeppelin' pyt 'brain damage - Pink Floyd' No web browser or even X needed. Just a cli and internet connection! mplayer is pauseable and can skip ahead This may break if youtube changes their search html.


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